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Photo Info

Dimensions3328 x 4992
Original file size8.55 MB
Image typeJPEG
Color spaceAdobe RGB (1998)
Date taken26-Sep-09 07:04
Date modified28-Sep-09 20:43
Shooting Conditions

Camera makeCanon
Camera modelCanon EOS-1Ds Mark II
Focal length70 mm
Max lens aperturef/2.8
Exposure1/1250 at f/2.8
FlashNot fired, compulsory mode
Exposure bias0 EV
Exposure modeAuto
Exposure prog.Aperture priority
ISO speedISO 200
Metering modePattern
Hot Air Balloons

Hot Air Balloons

The hot air balloon is the oldest successful human-carrying flight technology and is a subset of balloon aircraft. On November 21, 1783, in Paris, France, the first manned flight was made by Jean-François Pilâtre de Rozier and François Laurent d'Arlandes in a hot air balloon created by the Montgolfier brothers. Recently, balloon envelopes have been made in all kinds of shapes, such as hot dogs, rocket ships, and the shapes of commercial products. Hot air balloons that can be propelled through the air rather than just being pushed along by the wind are known as airships or, more specifically, thermal airships. A hot air balloon consists of a bag called the envelope that is capable of containing heated air. Suspended beneath is the gondola or wicker basket (in some long-distance or high-altitude balloons, a capsule) which carries the passengers and (usually) a source of heat, usually an open flame. The heated air inside the envelope makes it buoyant since it has a lower density than the relatively cold air outside the envelope. Unlike gas balloons, the envelope does not have to be sealed at the bottom since the air near the bottom of the envelope is at the same pressure as the surrounding air. In today's sport balloons the envelope is generally made from nylon fabric and the mouth of the balloon (closest to the burner flame) is made from fire resistant material such as Nomex.